First 3D-Printed House Expected This Year

February 20, 2019

3D printers have been around for quite some time now, but did you think 2019 would be the year an entire house would be 3D printed? We're living in the future.

Curve Appeal Design, WATG

Courtesy of Wimberly, Allison,Tong & Goo.

Branch Technology will soon be breaking ground in Chattanooga, Tennessee on the world's first free-form 3D-printed home, which was designed by Wimberly, Allison, Tong & Goo. The firm submitted their Curve Appeal design to Branch's Freeform Home Design Challenge and came out on top. The house will be built with Branch's cellular fabrication (C-FAB) technology, using approximately 100 pieces of printed carbon-fiber-reinforced ABS thermoplastic to create the net-zero-energy structure's "lattice-like matrix." Other materials like gypsum composite, spray foam, or concrete will be added for structural capacity and energy efficiency. The construction firm, Branch Technology, has significant experience 3D-printing, having already printed furniture, drone landing pads, and the SHoP Pavillion, which was made for 2016's Design Miami festival.

3D Office, Dubai Future Foundation

Courtesy of Dubai Future Foundation.

While Curve Appeal may be the first 3D-printed house, the first 3D-printed office was constructed in Dubai in 2016. The entire 2,000-square-foot office was 3D-printed, including the furniture, and took only 17 days to construct.

3D Footbridge, U.S. Marine Corp

Courtesy of Construction Dive.

Additionally, the U.S. military has been busy making progress in the 3D-printing construction world as well. The Marine Corp Systems Command Advanced Manufacturing Operations Cell (AMOC) and its Automated Construction of Expeditionary Structures (ACES) built a 500-square-foot barracks building in just 40 hours with their 3D printer. The Marines also recently constructed a footbridge at Camp Pendleton in California during a logistics exercise. This was the first time a bridge like this was 3D-printed in the field rather than in a controlled, factory setting in the Western Hemisphere. Taking this credit in stride, the Marines intend to continue 3D-printing for operational and humanitarian efforts.

For more information, visit Construction Dive.